19Oct2017Headlines:

Duties After Pilot Departure

Duties After Pilot Departure

Duties After Pilot Departure

There are many technicalities that are involved in running a ship. We will tell you about the duties after pilot departure today. When the ship is out of the port the marine engineers have a lot of tasks to be done as the pilots are gone. The marine engineers are responsible for the adjustment of the main engine, starting fresh water generator, etc. we will try to understand first what a pilot on board means.

Once the cargo loading and unloading is done the port clearance orders are given. It is an hour’s notice that is given. The engine room is then manned and the additional generator is started. As per the checklist the main engine is then made ready for the engineers. Before the arrival of the pilot the control test and the steering gear test are done. The recordings are put in the engine movement record book.

When the pilot arrives on board the order of standby is given. This means that that pilot is a stand by the main control of the engine control room will be attended by the engineer now. He will take the full control of the ship and manage the maneuvering too. This is so as the engine cannot be trusted completely it can show signs of false operations. If there is any problem then the engineer can take control of the engine and set it right. We cannot trust a machine but definitely a man can be more trust worthy. The readings that are indispensible to be recorded in the time of the standby are – the main engine revolution counter, flow meters for main engine, generator and Boilers, and flow meter for cylinder oil.

In modern ships another important factor that must be kept in mind is that HFO purifier is always running in the ship. This is so as the systems are running on heavy oil. Diesel oil purifier needs to be started in the older ships. During the process of maneuvering the data is recorded by the data logger. The movements are recorded in the bell book as already mentioned and is kept in the engine room control. Maneuvering is a very critical function and requires good control and team work to do it effectively. The engine room in located at the base of the ship so the ones who are operating there don’t know what the situation is above water this is exactly why they depend completely on the bridge team. This makes the communication between the two all the more critical.

Duties after Pilot Departure are many more apart from the ones mentioned above. As the ship moves out of the port and into the sea the next status update is pilot away. This means that the ship is into the sea now. No more engine movements can be expected now in normal situation. The engine is adjusted now for optimal efficiency. The additional generators are shut and normal work on the ship is carried on. At this time again a set of recordings are made so that the marine engineer can do his calculations. The recordings that are made are very crucial and are also kept in the engine room for records.

After the fresh water generator is started the main engine is adjusted to maximum revs. The boiler that is quite exhausted by now is taken for service. The boiler is put in the auto shop for maintenance. Sometimes it happens that the auxiliary engines are cooled by the use of the sea water pumps. These are then changed over to the main cooling sea water pump. All the safety is tested and then the chief engineer when sure that the ship and the engine are in complete control goes to his office or cabin and completes the paper works. These steps are very vital. May become a routine and boring at times but the chief engineer is expected to do it with great devotion and commitment.

Apart from these main duties that form a part of the duties after pilot departure there are many more jobs that are assigned to the marine engineer and the chief engineer that they must do with all commitment. A slight negligence can be very fatal.

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