17Apr2014Headlines:

Container Ship Travel

Described as a challenging job, container ship travel does not require specialized experience compared to some other marine vessels sailing across the oceans. Container ship travels is relatively fixed since many vessels have their route planned in advance and may remain on this route for many trips since the cargo going to and from this place remains relatively stable from the producers and consumers alike.

Container Ship Travel

Container Ship Travel

For this reason many sailors that are involved in container ship travel are able to plane when they will be at a port, this capability to be able to plane that you will be coming to a certain place after a certain period of time than paves way for the container ship personnel to make arrangements that suite them on of the commonly visited harbors or ports.

Container ship travel is normally the same for most vessels since they maintain working through a specific route unless something very important comes along the way and they are redirected to other places or destinations. In the same way they you find the public transport on land is organized with each vehicles, plane, or train specifically plighting a certain route the same applies for marine vessels.

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This ability to know when and where you will be on land means that many sailors that have families will relocate them to these ports, so as to be able to include family life in to their life. This ability to plan in advance were you will be sailing too make container ship travel much less stress full compared to their marine vessels. Some ULCC (ultra large crude carriers) and navy vessels or submarine hardly see land for weeks or even months while at sea, only returning  after the practice drill is over and not knowing the next destination. ULCC personnel are also cancelled to this fait since they are blocked on a vessel that is far too large to visit most harbors and ports but carries demand since all crude transporters want them due to their reduce costs of transport. This makes the vessels next destination unpredictable and personnel are at the mercy of clients who hire the vessel to transport crude to their destinations thus making it almost impossible to predict the next port that will be visited.

The added fact that the vessels do not enter most harbors and ports further increases the pressures on the sailors. With the vessel docked on in the deeper waters sailors have to remain on board for long periods at a time and in most cases they get to change shift with another crew that replaces them for a brake before they step on a port. Deep sea oil rigs are other marine jobs that require the personnel to remain on board for weeks or months at a time, but most of these humanitarian stains have not gone unnoticed by the maritime world and most of these sailors are given compulsory leave after a six month period thus giving them ample time to refresh themselves for the next shift on board marine vessels that hardly see dry land.

For the above reasons container ship travel has been considered by many sailors as the most predictable marine job were one is able to include his family life in to the jobs, a factor that has been considered vital for the continuity of sailors on marine vessels over long period of time rather than early retirement due to harsh conditions that tire and mentally disturb the personnel on board marine vessels.

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David is designated a Naval Aviator and has held a variety of operational and staff assignments.

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